September 13th, 2004

Happy

Relaxation. What an interesting concept.

It's been far too long since I set out to do nothing. Sure, sometimes I spend evenings doing nothing, but even then I'm finding weird things that spark my mind or furiously thinking and worried because there is stuff I should be doing and I have creative energy, but I can't make it match up.

Not tonight. For the first time in a long time, I've been low on the creativity. But not in a bad, should-be-making-mad-memes kind of way. More in the "It's Sunday night. I've done all the weird thinking I can get done, I've externalised some things about myself that I wasn't particularly of a mind to admit, I've prioritised what I want to write. So what now?"

'What now' was sitting here, chatting in general, reading some of the stuff I bought from RPGNow.com, and not worrying about what wasn't being done. No storm of thoughts, no mad frenetic energies causing me to pull off some Astro-Gods from beyond the wall of Order, none of that. Quiet in my head, in a good way.

It's an interesting feeling. And one I've not experienced properly for a long time.
  • Current Mood
    relaxed relaxed
Finger

RB:

Copyright officials recommended on Thursday that U.S. law be amended so that companies that rely on copyright infringement to make a profit can be held liable for their actions.

"The copyright office is now suggesting the exploration of a new and radically unprecedented approach to copyright law," said Bob Schwartz, counsel for the Consumer Electronics Association and the Home Recording Rights Coalition. "It would not require that a defendant in a copyright suit have any knowledge of infringing conduct, any relationship with a particular infringer or any intent to commit a violation of the law."

The copyright office proposed that a company that makes technologies that help individuals digitally transmit copyright materials to the public will be liable if the firm relies on such infringing activities to make money or attract people to its service.

[Ed: So let's give the INDUCE act even more power and ignore many more items of historical precedent — If this had gone through 30 years ago, nobody would have heard of Sony and the VCR, dual-cassette deck and much more would never have arrived.]